What are you reading 2.0

Discussion in 'Non-WOT - Literature and Fiction' started by Aduiavas Ida, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. Ealandrelle Melyma

    Ealandrelle Melyma Aes Sedai Head of the Red Ajah

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    I am reading (listening) to Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell. It was recommended to me by @Enelya al'Morna Taken me ages to get around to it, but I'm so glad I did!

    Next on the list is The Fifth Season by NK Jemisin. I have the paperback, but I struggle to get reading time. Like others, I listen to audiobooks when commuting or doing chores.
     
  2. Juliya Karasu

    Juliya Karasu

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    I recently finished this as well and loved it SO much!! The mini-series is also really well done.

    I just finished reading Queens of the Conquest: England's Medieval Queens by Alison Weir. So interesting. It's putting me in a medieval mood and I want to make a costume.

    Also I have Naomi Novik's Spinning Silver just out from the library to read. I read her first one, Uprooted, and really enjoyed that. Haven't read her Temeraire series, though.
     
  3. Kassina Tendar

    Kassina Tendar Aes Sedai

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    I love that book! It's one of my favorites. :)
     
  4. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    What is it about? I know you and I have very similar taste, so I'm totally interested now!
     
  5. Ealandrelle Melyma

    Ealandrelle Melyma Aes Sedai Head of the Red Ajah

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    It's set in the late 1700s into the early 1800s, mainly in England. The premise is that at some point English magic died out, and (very broadly speaking) it is about the attempts of two men to revive English magic. Add in some alternative history, and some tricksy fae, and you have an interesting story.
     
  6. Kassina Tendar

    Kassina Tendar Aes Sedai

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    Plotwise, it's about an alternate version of 19th century England where magic used to exist, but hasn't been practiced in awhile. There are theoretical magicians still around (people who read about magic and theorize about it), but no one's really able to do it... until suddenly a grumpy man shows up and performs a feat of magic. (Mr. Norrell) You also meet Jonathan Strange who is a more friendly man who is able to do magic. The book is basically the story of the two of them meeting, kind of becoming rivals, learning about magic, and you get to see how both England and each of the magicians reacts to their discoveries and their newfound stardom. (Mr. Norrell kinda hates everyone, wants to keep his knowledge to himself, and doesn't want to be a celebrity, while Jonathan Strange is friendly and thinks knowledge about magic should be shared)

    The story is interesting, but really my favorite part about it is the writing style and the world. Susanna Clarke writes in a kind of 19th century style (similar to Jane Austen's style), but also uses the narration to poke fun at all the characters. There are also lots of footnotes with background on the world and the history of both theoretical and practical magic in England (which are also often used as witty sidenotes to poke fun at the story). I find it a delightful read. :) I've read it through twice (which is rare for me; I don't usually reread) and want to read it again sometime. It's a pretty distinctive style and I don't think it's for everyone, but I love it.
     
  7. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    Okay, that sounds amazing! Especially since I just finished Persuasion a couple weeks ago.
     
  8. Enelya al'Morna

    Enelya al'Morna Aes Sedai

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    Oh, YAY, Eala! :D Isn't it wonderful! She is so clever, it's just one of the most remarkable books I've ever read. It's so convincing in how detailed all the footnotes are that I had to google some of the authors/books she mentions to see if they were real. Her creation of a whole alternate history is incredible. Still one of my favourite books and audiobooks after years :D It makes me laugh out loud, and cry sometimes with how beautiful the writing is, and I've relistened to it more times than I can remember now. And it's a really good use of an Audible credit because it's sooo long :lol

    I hope you really enjoy it if you try it Stephen!
     
  9. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    Well, I got the audiobook. Which was huge, btw.
     
  10. Lenore Carvoe

    Lenore Carvoe Aes Sedai

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    After re-reading Patrick Rothfuss, I re-started Scott Lynch. Obviously, I read too many books by authors who haven't finished writing yet. :tug
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2018 at 5:23 PM
  11. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    And authors, too, whose writing progress stalls due to mental illness. :p
     
  12. Kassina Tendar

    Kassina Tendar Aes Sedai

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    I did that, too! It's all very convincing.

    How is the audiobook with the footnotes? Do they let you know somehow when you're listening to a footnote instead of the story?
     
  13. Enelya al'Morna

    Enelya al'Morna Aes Sedai

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    He speaks the footnotes as they come in the text, so stops halfway through a sentence sometimes and says 'Footnote one' and reads it then and there. I didn't find it confusing, but I'd read it before I listened. He's an excellent narrator, really gets the humour and tone :)
     
  14. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    Yeah. I'm listening for the first time and don't mind the footnotes at all.
     
  15. Alenya Al'Roran

    Alenya Al'Roran Citizen

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    I just finished Memory of Light. Where do I go from here?
     
  16. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    Depression. Then Brandon Sanderson.
     
  17. Stephen Lightheart

    Stephen Lightheart Novice

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    @Ealandrelle Melyma, @Enelya al'Morna, @Juliya Karasu, @Kassina Tendar! This is the best recommendation ever. I'm so glad I decided to read it immediately upon finishing my previous read. :omg:loveThank you! I got @Winterdawn Lightheart to start reading it as well.

    I love everything about this book. I adore the writing style and the setting. I love how she's not afraid of approaching scenes from unexpected angles. The scene where Mr. Norrell revives the young lady is such a great example of this. I love how the fae picks something to take from her, and then we cut away and are made to wait a while. I also absolutely adore the death of Lawrence Strange. That was such a perfect little chapter. I'm now 17% in and excited to read more.