Favourite Authors & New Books

Discussion in 'Non-WOT - Literature and Fiction' started by Lei'Le Vumf, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. Cursor Wrathwind

    Cursor Wrathwind Gaidin

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    Yeats is arguably my favorite poet of all time, although he gets some stiff competition from his countryman Seamus Heaney.

    "Red Rose, proud Rose, sad Rose of all my days..."
     
  2. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    I can't say I have a favourite poet, a couple of favourite poems maybe. ..
    if u had to pick a favourite genre of writing, what would you pick?
     
  3. Sailea Nerid

    Sailea Nerid Aes Sedai

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    I think my favourite one by Yeats is 'Her Anxiety', as for the genre I like a certain mixture between fantasy and philosophy like in Haruki Murakami's books.
     
  4. Cursor Wrathwind

    Cursor Wrathwind Gaidin

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    Epic poetry and folklore.
     
  5. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    WoT fits well into Epic ...and poetry & folklore too in a way. I will read pretty much anything but fantasy & Sci-Fi are usually first choice. Folklore usually contributes alot to fantasy books, books that manage to create their own folklore inside the story world always keep my attention better...more depth I guess.
     
  6. Cursor Wrathwind

    Cursor Wrathwind Gaidin

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    WoT doesn't quite fit in the mythic/foklore realm for me, actually. LOTR (and especially The Silmarillion and the Children of Hurin) are much closer to what I'm going for.
     
  7. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    So if u had to define WoT how would you define it? Epic fantasy?
     
  8. Cursor Wrathwind

    Cursor Wrathwind Gaidin

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    It is Epic or High Fantasy, but for me that's still different in substance from what is understood by Epic Poetry. If I could try to explain it--something like WoT or ASoIaF is "epic" because of their scope: they're globe spanning adventures with nothing less than the fate of the universe at stake. Oftentimes, conversely, Epic Poetry is far more limited. The Iliad, for instance, is about just a few months in a ten year war that ultimately means precious little in the long run besides the honor and fame of Achilles and the Greeks. The Odyssey is one man's personal struggle to return home while running afoul of a god for his impiety and arrogance. The Aeneid is about the quest of an exiled nation to build a new home and integrate in a new community. The Metamorphoses isn't even a single narrative, but a series of episodes intended to covey moral/religious lessons. Of the major European epics, the only one that comes to mind that does engage in this grand, cosmic level scope with massive stakes for the whole universe is Paradise Lost...and Paradise Lost is a very unique case among epics (and a masterpiece, from which I tattooed a line on my arm).

    Now, they're similar in that they often involve larger than life heroes and villains (Rand and the Dark One, Achilles, Odysseus, Aeneas and Turnus, Roland and El Cid, Rama and Ravanna, etc.) and forces so powerful as to be beyond mortal ken (the Wheel itself and the Weave, the involvement of Greco-Roman gods, the forces of Heaven and Hell), but that's about where the similarities end. Epic Fantasy is about big stakes, big personalities, big power and the focus is on the adventure and the quest, which often involves said personalities conquering or mastering said power. Epic Poetry, on the other hand, is about cultures/societies and their values, morals and belief systems, and ALL of them emphasize that man is not the supreme force in the universe and that there are rules and powers which will always be above him, whether that law be guest right (Iliad and Odyssey), sin and penance (the Divine Comedy), God's omnipotence (Paradise Lost) or something else.

    A few works are able to straddle both genres fairly deftly. Notably Le Mort d'Arthur among classics and The Silmarillion among modern works.
     
  9. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    Oh wow. That was alot more information than I was expecting. Other than the little snippets of poetry, foretelling, songs etc that are at the start of each chapter, (or Thom performing) there really isn't much in the way of poetry in the WoT books. I've never really thought about the definition of epic poetry before, but I think you've defined it really well. Thanx :)
     
  10. Kerwin Thaumiel

    Kerwin Thaumiel Maybe a TARDIS Gaidin

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    Neal Asher, Peter F Hamilton, Steven Erikson, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter, Isaac Asimov, James S.A. Corey, William Gibson, David & Leigh Eddings, Katharine Kerr, R.A. Salvatore, Elizabeth Moon, Andrzej Sapowski, Nick Perumov, H.P Lovecraft.

    hard to stop when I started to count favorite authors.
     
  11. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    :lol I know what you mean. I read some work of most of those authors. ..and lots of some of the authors Asimov, Eddings, Kerr, Moon, Pratchett. ..so many to choose from and so little time (that I can devote solely to reading anyway) :D
     
  12. Sailea Nerid

    Sailea Nerid Aes Sedai

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    Nick Perumov :joy I really love him!
     
  13. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    I dont recognize the name at all....I'll have to check it out next time I go to the library :look
     
  14. Sailea Nerid

    Sailea Nerid Aes Sedai

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    He is really great in my opinion. I read him in Russian but I believe there are English translations. Try to find Godsdoom, it's my favourite ^^
     
  15. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    I'll add him to my current list of authors to check on at the library.
    *hmm pretty sure I left it on the kitchen bench with the electric bill* :look
     
  16. Kerwin Thaumiel

    Kerwin Thaumiel Maybe a TARDIS Gaidin

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    Unfortunately there are not that many of his books which has been translated to English as far as I know.
    Amazon.com has one and that is Godsdoom.
    I have read him in Swedish, because they have translated on of his series to Swedish.
    But most of the books are in Russian.
     
  17. Sailea Nerid

    Sailea Nerid Aes Sedai

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    His book with Sergey Lukyanenko is also quite good, it's called No Time for Dragons (I suppose, the original title is Не Время Для Драконов)
     
  18. Aran Cherubim

    Aran Cherubim Resident Citizen

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    Just an addendum to this: the term epic poetry (or an "epos" in a specific case) are literally just very long, narrative poems. The idea of "epicness" (as in cosmological stuff) is a later use of the term, kinda like how "saga" has evolved into a term for a lengthy series of stories in modern English usage, whereas the original Old Norse just meant pretty much any narrative story revolving around a specific person's life or a group.
     
  19. Lei'Le Vumf

    Lei'Le Vumf

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    I guess I've always thought of "epic" meaning both long and great. Anyone could write long stories or poetry but for it to be classed as epic it had to be really good, well regarded
     
  20. Aran Cherubim

    Aran Cherubim Resident Citizen

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    Epic as "good" is a very recent usage of the word, and should probably be limited to be an adjective rather than a noun, imho.

    That's not really a good indicator of genre though, which is the sense of the word I gather was discussed here. There are good* epics, and there are bad* epics (though I cannot come up with any off my head), just as there are good novellas and bad novellas, for example. It's not really possible (or rather, desireable) to have a genre which is defined as "all the good stuff". ;) I guess the closest we have to that today is the term "literary fiction" which can come off as a bit elitist, as it's sometimes used to push away everything within sci-fi, fantasy, horror or other from academic recognition, and conversely, to take it in once they've received recognition elsewhere.

    (*Good and bad obviously being subjective to a large degree.)
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2016